Beverly Hillbillies

This is a spot for posting those old photos of your service days, your favorite tractor, whatever...Don't be shy we all love looking at pictures! No Nekkid People though, this is a "G" rated site!

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m3a1
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 21st, 2020, 2:37 pm

(click on photo to enlarge)

My wife sent me this and it was too good not to share...
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Personally, I think the playing with stuff percentage is a little low but...

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by Hambone » May 21st, 2020, 4:26 pm

:lol: I agree, I'm usually bitching when I can't find something, not when I'm finding misplaced treasures.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 21st, 2020, 4:31 pm

That's kind of the point. It's like we're burying a favorite bone in the back yard....so we can dig it up later!

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 21st, 2020, 5:55 pm

The mystery of how the cap on the star adjuster got damaged has been solved.

Perfect fit.
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Cheers,
TJ
Last edited by m3a1 on May 23rd, 2020, 2:58 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 21st, 2020, 6:10 pm

But what do you do about damage like that? Can't put a bandaid on it. I'm certainly not going to bin an otherwise good brake shoe for such minor damage. I'm not going to leave that damage there, either, and for two reasons -

1. Sooner or later that lining is going to wear down and maybe that metal from the foundation will be exposed and next, it will be cutting a nice big groove into a good brake drum.
2. As the shoe lining becomes worn and thinner there, it is likely to fracture there because of the uneven surface pressure behind it.

THIS CALLS FOR SURGERY! If we can't cure the ailment, we'll just cut it out!

While it's not pretty, my solution is to remove that minor bit of shoe lining and shoe foundation. It looks weird, but as long as that shoe ends up being installed in the front half of the assembly, normal forward rotation of the drum against it won't exert any especially harsh energy upon the new edge.

In a daily driver, particularly one that is being operated on the street, I would probably replace that but for a machine like this; something thats going to spend most of it's time bombing around the bean fields, I think I can live with it....
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And finally, the old shoes get masked off, primed and readied for paint.
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Cheers,
TJ
Last edited by m3a1 on May 23rd, 2020, 3:00 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 22nd, 2020, 7:44 pm

A beautiful day today, but with the high heat and humidity, I've a feeling we've got some more weather coming. But, I felt like I needed a 'Win' today so I set up a fan and a cold beverage, a rag to collect the sweat and got down to the business of restoring these brakes to usefulness.

Keep in mind that I have a collection of parts that have come from the four corners of the globe and that we are dealing with a vehicle that has been through many hands and I am going from a 3/4" wheel cylinder up front to a 1" wheel cylinder. As a result, things are a tiny bit on the tight side when it comes to the matter of working them in there.

Thus, certain things have to happen beforehand and these wheel cylinders cannot just be slammed in willy nilly. As per normal, the bleeder must come out along with the little cap the manufacturer put in the threaded port (which will become useful a bit). I would like to add, I was a little surprised to find a 10mm bleeder in this but...hey, whatever.)

The boots and the guts must come out of the wheel cylinder as well. There is just NO getting it worked in there with the boots on and I didn't want to risk anything else just falling out once they were removed. So the wheel cylinder got completely stripped out of necessity and due diligence.

This is a moment when having taken the time to clean the workspace up really pays off because there are no little pieces of junk dribbling into what you're working on. That extra advance effort really makes the work to assemble these parts, that were only moments ago total strangers to one another, a real pleasure.
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With such tight spaces to work in, it is sometimes easier to do the assembly in a less orderly fashion. Note that the wheel cylinder isn't bolted down and I'm already starting to thread the small 'Z'-shaped brake line into it. In this case it was just simpler that way. I've been a very linear thinker for a very long time...long enough to realize that it can occasionally be counter productive. Some times going from 'A' to 'C' to 'B' and then on to 'X', 'Y' and 'Z' is the better route.
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And sometimes...the desire to use shiny new parts just doesn't work out the way you wanted it to. As pretty as this brand new line is, it simply doesn't fit well and there are no extra points awarded for jamming things in that don't, or won't, fit. So, I take it back apart and install the old parts which are still serviceable. Just be glad I didn't turn out to be a transplant surgeon.
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The old line DOES fit...with a business-card's-width to spare. Good enough..
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Cheers,
TJ
Last edited by m3a1 on May 23rd, 2020, 3:09 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 22nd, 2020, 8:13 pm

The working bits of the brake assembly are partially assembled off the truck. Lay out two shoes, crossed at the top. Install the lower return spring and the star adjuster which should be fully screwed inward to make it as short as possible. No matter what side you are working on, the star-wheel goes toward the front. Install the conical retaining springs by placing them in the center hole of each shoe.

You may have noticed I've painted the brake shoe foundations and did what might be considered a poor job of masking off the shoe but my goal was to better preserve the part, not make it pretty. Sometimes new shoes will come with every surface painted. On those shoes, the surface that comes in contact with the drum should be block sanded to remove the paint. The bottom line is this... paint on the sides of your shoes is really of no consequence.
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Next, carefully cantilever the shoes apart at the top, using the star adjuster as a fulcrum, and lay them out on a flat surface. Check to ensure your star adjuster is properly oriented (Remember, the star goes toward the front!) Also check to ensure the assembled parts are fully engaged with one another.
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To install this assembly, hold it vertically, spread the shoes apart from one another at the top and put it below the hub and behind the hub drive flange. Lift it straight up into place and allow the shoes to come back together. At this point, if all is well, the shoes should pretty much hang there by themselves. Check to ensure they are properly located and fitting well to the backing plate.

Here's where that 3/16" pin punch will come in very handy....especially one with a little bend in it, like mine. First, make sure your spring anchors are ready at hand. Insert the punch into the conical retaining springs and push inward, extending the spring through the backing plate. Hook the spring anchor to the spring and guide it into the hole in the backing plate while relaxing the pressure on the spring. The spring anchor is a close fit and installed properly, should lay completely flush with the surface of the backing plate. Do this for both brake shoes.

Sorry, no picture of this process. My hands were full!

Install the top return springs. It does not matter which of these two springs are installed first.
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Then check all your previous work.
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Cheers,
TJ
Last edited by m3a1 on May 23rd, 2020, 3:13 am, edited 8 times in total.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 22nd, 2020, 8:38 pm

With the working bits of the brake assembled to the backing plate, I decided to install the new brake hoses, chiefly because with them installed I would be able to seal them off and stop there....and not have to worry about them once our weather gets here and I'm forced to take a break.

Here is a visual comparison of the old hose, the aftermarket hose, and the new USGI hose. Most notable is the lack of any type of flange on the aftermarket hose. If you have been following, you may recall I made mention of salvaging the old washers from the old hose, then to be put back into use with a new hose as may be necessary. This is where this kind of effort pays off. It seems cheap but it is one less thing to have to track down....and one less thing to have to pay for.
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Sometimes that linear thinking is a boon. Sometimes it is a burden. In this case, it is advantageous to start getting things threaded together and THEN install the brake hose retaining clip, rather than bending a brake line just to get it to fit on a firmly anchored brake hose that doesn't need to be firmly anchored at that moment. Basically, this is one of those 'path of least resistance' kinda things. Just a little something to think about.
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Remember our little freebie cap that came with the wheel cylinder? I'm putting it back to work, protecting my assembly to this point.
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Cheers,
TJ
Last edited by m3a1 on May 22nd, 2020, 10:09 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 22nd, 2020, 8:57 pm

Here's a hint for installing those brake hose retaining clips. Tapping it on is far easier if some pressure is put against the clip with a punch or a screwdriver so that the clip doesn't deflect because, once they're bent, all bets are off!
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Sometimes, when I go back and look at my work, I see things that I wasn't really thinking about earlier. Take this clip's orientation for example. Doesn't seem like a big thing at this moment in time, right? And yet...
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Oriented in THIS way, this clip is far less likely to trap and hold dirt and water. Yeah, that's MUCH better. No one will ever imagine that we paused, gave that some thought and made a change. Sometimes, addressing the little things make a good job into a great job.
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Cheers,
TJ
Last edited by m3a1 on May 22nd, 2020, 10:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 22nd, 2020, 9:18 pm

A shout out to Bill in VA and a big THANK YOU for the Airsoft M60. It looks fabulous. I'm very pleased. Can't wait to show it off to my buddies.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 23rd, 2020, 1:36 pm

Bucky sez, "Hey, Dad! I know this may seem like I'm being nosy but why is there a cannon in the living room? Is there something I should know?"
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Don't worry about it. Just be glad we have it.
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by rickf » May 23rd, 2020, 8:32 pm

Does it weight exactly 23lbs?
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 23rd, 2020, 9:35 pm

I'm sure it doesn't, but it's pretty darned heavy.

I already have a variety of mounting options, which is really nice...
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This is a later production, short post M142 meant for the HUMMWV.
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That would be a misfortune except I got this mount for a great price. Putting it on the MUTT in this way only means that I can't really drive around safely with it mounted (not that I would actually fear that it would somehow come up out of the mount... but you get the idea). No matter. It'll make a great display at the car shows and that's a huge plus.
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As an added bonus, this will also mount the M240B with the addition of a simple adaptor - Adapter, Gun, M240, mount 142, Part Number 12598081, and I think I know right where one is for a right price!

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » May 26th, 2020, 5:51 pm

I couldn't find the limitations for refacing the brake drums in the book so I'm assuming the high point of the chamfered edge on the inner edge of the drum is the no-go line. I took them over to O'Reilly's today and dropped them off. Only one drum was showing unusual wear, that being the right front with the misaligned shoe. Should have these back by the end of the day. Fingers crossed and will have pics of the finished product, later on.

Not much mechanical progress over the course of the last two days as there has been a lot of yard clean-up to do between these heavy evening storms but have made progress on things having nothing to do with the Doom Buggy so, happily, there is that.

Had a fellow call me today who I had been helping with an old CJ. I told him I was still willing to lend a hand provided he take my advice on matters such as preventative maintenance matters. I know he's anxious to drive his barnyard bomber and I'm just as anxious that he doesn't ruin it in his haste to play with it. Matters such as fluids and lubricants are just as important as everything else. So, I may share some of that with y'all as well.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by Mr. Recovery » May 26th, 2020, 6:19 pm

m3a1 wrote:
May 26th, 2020, 5:51 pm
I couldn't find the limitations for refacing the brake drums in the book so I'm assuming the high point of the chamfered edge on the inner edge of the drum is the no-go line. I took them over to O'Reilly's today and dropped them off. Only one drum was showing unusual wear, that being the right front with the misaligned shoe. Should have these back by the end of the day. Fingers crossed and will have pics of the finished product, later on.



Cheers,
TJ
TJ, the inner edge of the drum is tapered, you shouldn't go past that taper. :roll: PS: just found it in my book, the max limit is 9.170 inches
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