Beverly Hillbillies

This is a spot for posting those old photos of your service days, your favorite tractor, whatever...Don't be shy we all love looking at pictures! No Nekkid People though, this is a "G" rated site!

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Hambone
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by Hambone » April 4th, 2020, 9:15 am

TJ
Tell your wife how much we appreciate her service, my sister is on the front line.

terratek
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by terratek » April 4th, 2020, 6:29 pm

Hey, if you decide to keep it (farm vehicle, tooling around the quarry, etc), or if you need one for a diff project, I found a 600watt 24vdc - pure sine wave inverter sitting in my storage, i think i bought it as a backup for the wheelchair back when dad was in better shape. So, powerful enough to run any 5 amp a/c tools, a cooler, etc.
1967 United Tractor CN-40-A
1972 M109A3
1987 M105A2
19?? M151 Sand Rail (passed on to the next victim)

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m3a1
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » April 5th, 2020, 12:52 am

Lets have a look at the goodies after this blows overland we're allowed to crawl out of our foxholes. What exactly were those racks you mentioned earlier?

Cheers,
TJ

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m3a1
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » April 7th, 2020, 3:52 pm

Contrary to the rumor circulating that I am either dead, or dying, I am actually alive and well and so is the family. My wife continues to roll the dice with too many Covid-19 patients and too little PPE.

A bunch of bad weather forced a small hiatus from the Doom Buggy but parts are in and today I am making some good headway. More in a little while.

Cheers,
TJ

Mark
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by Mark » April 7th, 2020, 5:42 pm

May God bless her with good health and well-being and Hambone's sister too
mark


1968 m274A5
1960 m151
1981 m151A2
1964 m416
1971 m416

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m3a1
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » April 7th, 2020, 11:25 pm

Thank you Mark!

Since Covid-19 is still on everybody's mind, here's my old N100 rig. However much you do or how little you do, don't forget the eye-protection. Every one of us has seen two droplets of water co-mingle. Remember those big wet eyeballs in your head would very easily pick up aerosolized droplets containing the virus. I have much better eye-pro coming, by the way. it's also always a good idea not to stroll in someone else's prop-wash. 6 foot distance standing still. Far more while walking behind someone. Common sense.

By the way, if you have a respirator of ANY kind that has an exhalation vent and if you are ill, DO NOT wear it as a means of protecting others. Exhalation vents vent to the open air!

I prefer the half-face respirators. it's what I trained with and they are ultimately less expensive and far easier to maintain than the ever-popular N95. The filters last a lot longer and the whole thing can be wiped down to be sterilized after each use without any risk of handling, or harming the filter element. Once properly sterilized and air dried, it goes into a ziplock bag (with your name on it) until the next use. No matter what kind of mask you are wearing, do not get the filter element wet. Also, we exhale a lot of moisture. Thus, paper or cloth masks may become damp. Depending upon a damp mask is a definite no-no. If you have a damp mask, allow it to air dry before securing it in a baggie between uses.

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Molded masks are symmetrical. Alas, my nose is not (courtesy of a particularly special learning moment while learning to box as a kid.) Hence, there exists a spot, where my broken nose was not properly reset, where the mask presses on my face. As long as it makes a seal, I'm happy.

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Ok, enough of that nonsense. Let's get back to something really important. Something we all know and love... Wrenching!

The last few days have been alternately cold and rainy, cold, damp, rainy, and more damp. During that time, the parts I ordered came in. Sweet! Today started out OK, then became really humid. Since I was fully immersed in the Doom Buggy I just mopped up the sweat and kept on rocking'.

Instructions that came with the manifolds kit began with the direction to clean all parts mating surfaces to as-new condition, or words to that effect. The language was so simple and direct that I concluded this was key to the matter or achieving leak-free manifolds. So, I decided I'd just settle in and do my level best to get there even if it took all day. So I set up a fan, got comfortable, and put some good music on.

One of the things I encountered were raised areas of corrosion so I was in there with the Dremel just to gently knock down the high points of rust, followed by light, but persistent action with emery cloth, paying special attention to the areas I know are prone to leakage. That was followed by an application of PB blaster which is a crackerjack chemical which when combined by a light wire-wheel action does a lovely job of bringing rust to its knees. Obviously you can overdo it and cut into these areas and clean them right out of spec so I was pretty careful not to go too 'whole hog.' Once I achieved (confirmed by feel, not by sight) a smooth surface that is where I stopped. Certain discolorations in metal can be deceiving so I relied upon feel.

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I believe I have already mentioned that I salvaged the rear output flange and yoke off of Xloflyr's old transmission. It has a new seal and, the yoke, a new sleeve. I started to take the one off the Doom Buggy's transmission and water started coming out. Not a lot, but definitely water which is not surprising since I already knew water had gotten into this transmission. Once the flange was taken off I could see there was a good deal of water/oil-slush in the void in the casting. Happily, that stuff gathering in the void kept it off the rear bearing. This transmission has had a seal leak for a while and there is a lot of clean up to be done in this area. It seems we have some time to get that done and done well. For those of you who are curious, the retaining bolts for the flange are not blind. They are through and through to the interior of the transmission. I will have to consult with the book but I suspect these will require crush washers, though what came off had regular lock washer. Just another something to follow up on.....

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I'm always on the look-out, which is part of the fun. The locking tabs aren't up! Naughty-naughty!

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Have a look at the salvage transmission's top plate. It's far worse than the one that came on the Doom Buggy. I'm happy to report I've gotten the Doom Buggy's assembly freed up and moving again. Lots of Dremel Tool action, PB Blaster and light machine oil. High point of the day was putting it back on the transmission and finding that YES!...I can actually shift gears! What a relief! I have a good feeling that, with a final clean up and lube and a lot of shifting, this assembly will be fully serviceable without having to do anything more to it. At some point I'm going to take the assembly from Xloflyer's transmission apart just to see what makes it tick and maybe put it back together and have one for a back-up (which, as a general rule, is a concept I am quite fond of). Two is one and one is none. I found out by accident that there are some rather tricky bits in there like lock-out buttons and such, so it should be great fun to get into it and let everybody see what it's all about.

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I'll be tagging and bagging the old flange, yoke, retaining bolts, lock washers and assorted other useful bits from the donor transmission. Waste not. Want not.

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Still waiting on a new retaining cap assembly for the shifter which is apparently coming from the other end of the known universe. But, by God this thing shifts! It REALLY shifts! This particular issue is the final (known) hurdle that had to be crossed. Can you tell I'm excited?

AND did I mention...IT SHIFTS! :lol: :lol: :lol:

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I'm a big fan of using new hardware but I'm not a big fan of risking life and limb to get it. So, with Covid-19 lurking behind every blade of grass, I'll just stay home a clean up old hardware, 'Old School.'

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Cooper sez, "I wanna go for a ride in the Doom Buggy! WHY IS THIS TAKING SO LONNNNNNG?!!"

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Bucky sez, "Dude, haven't you been paying attention? Dad says he's worried about the Corona Walrus! :wink:
"
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Wishing all y'all health and happiness.

Cheers,
TJ

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m3a1
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » April 8th, 2020, 11:38 pm

Started today with a final round of cleaning up the mating surfaces of the manifolds. These Dremel products make a final cleanup a snap. They don't last long but they last just long enough if you've done some preparatory cleaning and the results are flawless.

Here is the Mandrel, part number 402.

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Here we have cleaning/buffing wheels of two different abrasions, part number 511E. The lighter color is the more aggressive of the two. The twin pack, part number 512E contains two wheels of a less aggressive quality. These are a little pricey at about $8.00 per pack but they absolutely work and they are perfect for this job.

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Buffing with the mandrel aligned with the long axis of the exhaust manifold has the effect of putting less of the face of the cleaning wheel on the manifold. This allows for a bit more focused pressure while keeping the RPMs up. This achieves far better results than working at right angles to the long axis of the manifold while at the same time, maximizing the life of the wheel which is just about enough to get both manifolds done and not much more.

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This was the worst of the bunch insofar as cleaning things up went. Now it's just as nice as the rest!

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Now, I begin the first installation. The first installation is a dry run (without molybdenum) and is made to ensure everything fits nicely and it is also made to ensure I that I have the opportunity to learn what might trip me up. This may seem a bit like extraneous B.S. but there is a pandemic going on at the moment and I just don't want to get in a bind on anything if I can avoid it. For those with the experience to do this blindfolded, I tip my hat to you.

Instructions that come with the gasket kit (NSN 2530-01-161-7668, P/N 12302578) direct the user to make a series of witness marks for proper alignment of the exhaust manifold to the exhaust ports on the head. What you are seeing here is my witness mark indicating two things. Proper alignment and (happily) confirmation that the exhaust manifold has been returned to its original position. All the important indicators are in agreement.

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Take note that the hole for my exhaust manifold's 'locating bolt' is NOT centered as you might expect it to be. It left me scratching my head over the matter. I checked three times to make sure that my location for the exhaust manifold was spot on. So this offset (on my truck) while unexpected, is actually correct. Do NOT rely solely upon this hole being centered if you do this job. Yours may vary somewhat. So make the witness marks and check, check and check again. Allowable exhaust port alignment spec is +/- 1/8" which is just about all you could get from this oversized hole in any case. My guess is there are three chief reasons for leaking exhaust manifolds -
Overall cleanliness of the mating surfaces prior to assembly (or lack thereof)
Proper alignment of the exhaust manifold with the exhaust ports
Proper torque specs (which also involves having the correct lengths on the hardware) because over-tightening can deform the exhaust manifold.

Below that we see what started this whole business - one solitary expansion plug. Was this job worth all the effort? Well, I would have to say, on balance, Yes. Along the way we've undone some things that weren't done properly and once finished, we will have made another part of this machine fully serviceable and ready for action. (Not to mention we get to tinker with all the things we don't normally get to tinker with. BONUS!)

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Here we have some hardware. At the top, one of the new fasteners supplied in the kit, constructed of stainless steel. Thanks but no thanks! I'll stick with the steel ones. In the middle is one of the steel bolts that was in use previously but I have trimmed it to the proper length but, the cut end of the bolt has not yet been chamfered. You may remember that the previous guy made up for the extra bolt length by stacking two lock washers upon one another; something I did not want to see repeated on this job. The third bolt is the length that was being used earlier, with the lock washer stack. Take note, the shanks on the lower two bolts are of no consequence in this particular application.

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Since it is unreasonable to go out for new hardware (at this point in time it is downright illegal), trimming the bolts to length is the alternative. I'm trying to be a good American and a good Texan so, no cheating on this lockdown business! The placement of the old nut ensures I start my cut at the correct place. Once the cut is started I back the nut off from the cut just a bit keeping it on the shank end of the threads. After cutting, removing the nut conveniently trues up the threads at the cut end of the bolt when it comes off. It's a process that works and works well.

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The caliper probe indicates the actual depth of the blind, threaded holes in the head. We really don't want bolts bottoming out which is why that last fella stacked lock washers. This photo shows the length of the bolts supplied with the kit. Keep in mind I am using the old steel bolts, rather than stainless steel bolts. Thus, I am trying to nullify as many variables as I can so as to be as close as possible to the proscribed torque specs which, as it turns out, are very similar when comparing stainless steel fasteners to ferrous steel fasteners. Obviously, stainless steel is a somewhat softer metal and has a slightly lower torque spec.

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The kit came with a manifold outlet gasket as well as two stainless steel nuts and lock washers. Again, thanks, but no thanks on the hardware. The TM actually calls for brass nuts. I'll be sticking with steel for the time being, though it would be nice to have the brass ones.

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The kit also provides four new locktab washers. Very nice! Take note, there is NO lock washer employed with these bolts.

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It's coming right along!

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The flat washers employed with the fasteners on the four upper bolt holes across the top of the intake manifold are NOT provided in the kit. The kit does provide a single flat washer for the locating bolt, which is rather odd if you ask me. The mechanic who worked on this engine before me used no flat washers, only lock washers. So, I had to go to my collection of flat washers and root around in the washer drawer until I found four washers that matched the one provided in the kit (which, as it happens, is perfectly sized for the machined areas in the intake manifold). Things are not so easy during a pandemic. These flat washers were definitely not a popular size in my spares collection. I had to dig and dig and dig just to come up with them. Not fun when the humidity is high.

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This is what you'll need for the top row. One bolt, one lock washer and one flat washer per bolt hole across the top. Take note of the relieved area for the washer which can be seen in this photo, right off the end of my fingertips. Also take note that when installing the top row of the intake manifold, the locktab on the top right and top left of the exhaust manifold clamps may interfere with getting your flat washers down past the locktab ears. It's the little things that get ya. Take your time and all will be well.

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And this is what you'll need for the bottom row. Two bolts and the two-hole locktab washer. No other washers of any kind are employed on the bottom row.

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Here we have everything put on and in place. This is the final check for fitment, missing or overlooked parts and a return to the instructions to ensure I've checked everything on the list. I passed with flying colors. Now everything comes off for the application of molybdenum to the fasteners and the intake gaskets. (This is an A1 engine and does not use exhaust gaskets which is why there has been no mention of them.)

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Here's a hint. The upper locktabs for the exhaust manifold mounting clamps do intrude into the space you'll need to get a socket on the outer, upper mounting bolts of the intake manifold. Simply bend the locktab ear up just a bit to get the clearance you'll need.

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And here we are, looking very neat and tidy with everything in its proper place and secured with the proper assemblage of fasteners. Initial proscribed torque specs are dialed in on the low end and there will be another torque procedure to go through after a run-up, which is why the locktabs have not been bent over yet.

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I still have a misbehaving carburetor to deal with so the run-up will have to wait for a while. I'm happy to report that most of this particular job was centered on cleaning everything up and sorting through fasteners to get everything just so. The scut work really adds up, time wise. By happy coincidence, time is what we have a lot of. I think the next thing on the list is cleaning up the rear of the trans and making ready for the new tail shaft flange.. Stay tuned!

Cheers,
TJ

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m3a1
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » April 9th, 2020, 4:39 pm

Began the day with a decision to do a little and call it quits. The pollen was blowing around yesterday and now is certainly not the time to develop any kind of respiratory issues.

So, I began with the matter of the quick release steering hub which is been neither 'quick', nor has it been 'releasing' since I acquired this rig. I have been alternately dosing it with PB Blaster and light machine oil for a good long time without it showing any inclination to budge. So yesterday I warmed it up thoroughly with the MAP Gas torch and after it cooled I shocked it (between two hammers) just as you would with a ball joint or similar interference fit items and then redosed it with PB Blaster.

All that accomplished I felt today was the day to put the puller on it. Initially, it resisted completely. I shocked it again while the pressure from the puller was on it and it budged. I tightened it up a bit and it budged a little more and ever so slowly it came up and finally, off. But it resisted coming off every fraction of an inch. My earlier expectation was that I would find rust around and top and the bottom of the shaft.

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What I found was that rust had developed everywhere, throughout the whole interior surface. Wow!

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The exterior of the hub came around nicely after a serious visit to the wire wheel. I used the same Dremel tools I used yesterday to clean the interior.

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The shaft got the treatment with a wire wheel on a heavy drill, followed by the Dremel buffing wheels. Something I did not address in my earlier post needs to be mentioned. These Dremel tools MUST be used with quality eye-pro...particularly these buffing wheels whose lifespan is very short. Get a buffing wheel up against a sharp edge and it really sends debris everywhere.

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Painted the exterior of the hub with primer. Not much use in putting paint on the inside as the tolerances are very close. I'm happy to report that it now slides on and off just as easy as you please.

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This Metal Save product was given to me. A friend of mine, who is an inveterate dumpster diver, reclaimed about 4-5 cases of the stuff and gave me a case, gratis. I'll never get through it all....but it works and works well. I'm not sure what the recommended lube is for these quick release hubs. I'll figure that out later but I can assure you that I won't be leaving the steering wheel on there between outings. This was a real booger and it fought me every moment I was trying to remove it. Don't wanna do that again if I can avoid it.

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And here we have the rear output flange salvaged off of Xloflyer's junk transmission. All nice and clean, degreased, masked off and ready for a protective
coating of primer and paint.

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I got this into primer early in the day and a rather large storm brewed up to the north just after lunch. I managed to get it into paint before bailing out and heading for the house. Things are looking pretty good!

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Cheers,
TJ

terratek
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by terratek » April 9th, 2020, 9:56 pm

m3a1 wrote:
April 5th, 2020, 12:52 am
Lets have a look at the goodies after this blows overland we're allowed to crawl out of our foxholes. What exactly were those racks you mentioned earlier?

Cheers,
TJ
Not a problem! As for the racks, they would need some modification for almost any purpose other than the intended one. I still haven't moved them as I have been sidetracked working on a kawasaki 3-wheeler. That being said, here is a pic of what they look like installed on a tank.

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Folding rack extension, has fold out sides, jerry can bases, etc... planning on cutting and modding one to go on the back of my headache rack and another two to build my jeep roof rack
1967 United Tractor CN-40-A
1972 M109A3
1987 M105A2
19?? M151 Sand Rail (passed on to the next victim)

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m3a1
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » April 9th, 2020, 10:02 pm

Whoa! That's Huuuuuuuuge!

So, technically, you're a 'part owner' of an M1 Abrams tank!

terratek
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by terratek » April 9th, 2020, 10:11 pm

if we are going that route, then technically i am a part owner of a boeing as well, since i have a flir assembly from one that is going on either my jeep or f250 :P
1967 United Tractor CN-40-A
1972 M109A3
1987 M105A2
19?? M151 Sand Rail (passed on to the next victim)

rickf
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by rickf » April 10th, 2020, 7:57 am

I don't think I would admit to being part part owner of Boeing right now with all the issue they are having with crashing airplanes and unfulfilled military orders.
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » April 10th, 2020, 1:52 pm

terratek wrote:
April 9th, 2020, 10:11 pm
if we are going that route, then technically i am a part owner of a boeing as well, since i have a flir assembly from one that is going on either my jeep or f250 :P
I dunno man... You're going to get a lot of scat at ground level. Most of us just use fog lights. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by rickf » April 10th, 2020, 5:32 pm

And zombies are cold so they will not have an infrared signature. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies

Post by m3a1 » April 13th, 2020, 8:22 pm

Well, there has been a lot going on. First of all, my computer chose this critical time to take a dump. There's a lesson in there, somewhere.

So, I am operating with one arm tied behind my back, on the wife's fancy-schmantzy computer which (and I know this is going to sound odd) doesn't have a USB port. Ok, I get why it doesn't have a punch card reader, 8 track player, floppy disc, cassette deck, laser disc, CD-DVD player, or a pencil sharpener.... but no USB port?!!. What this means for you, dear reader, is there will be no pics for a while....at least not from me. It's the Dark Ages, all over again.

I've been fooling around with the rear drive shaft in preparation for the new U-joint which still hasn't arrived. Once that is put back on the vehicle I'll be loading up the transmission with an assortment of liquids in an effort to soften and break down the rust that's in there. As you know, we have full movement of the bits within the trans and with a little light exercise in there, coupled with some light oils, auto transmission fluid, etc. that should break it up and all will be well. I'll just put the Doom Buggy fully up on jack-stands and let the problem work itself out on a show roll. Wash, rinse, repeat until things are hunky-dory.

Unfortunately, one of the machined blocks that make up the caps on the U-joints went missing some time before I got it or we'd be on this transmission rehabilitation by now. I know the moment I borrow a U joint from one of my many salvage parts, the new one will arrive so, for now, I'm just biding my time and futzing around. The old U joint turned out to be in pretty good shape, considering the grease zerk was broken off and one cap-block was missing. Otherwise, the thing had no real wear. Having time on my hands, I elected to Easy-Out the remnants of the zerk (an effort which which failed spectacularly) and I ended up drilling it out, tapping it and installing a new zerk with threadlocker. Normally, I would have binned the thing but working through it is good training for the apocalypse....so I hung in there. That done, I cleaned everything up real good, packed the cruciform by hand and reinstalled the two caps. These things aren't cheap and generally, I save everything that is savable when it comes to U-joints. A penny saved is a penny earned.

I inspected the other U-joint that was still mounted on the drive shaft and it was a good as the other save for a single missing roller bearing. The Doom Buggy is the proverbial village bicycle (everyone has had a ride) and it pays to check every little thing. Since I save old roller bearings as well, I was able to add one and reassemble. So, on the matter of the rear drive shaft, we are close to it being done. Both drive shafts on this rig have been modified since the power pack is mounted far differently in terms of its distance to the differentials.

I decided I was tired of fooling around with greasy things so I switched over to the matter of the clutch and brake pedals which, described in plain english, are a bloody mess. They are laid out very poorly. The brake pedal has no provision for a return spring. The foot pads are too close together and I have serious doubts about keeping things as they are. But, rather than pursue an entirely different plan, I will simply try to get things sorted without 'reinventing the wheel'. With that done, if it works....it works. I can always throw some money at this later if the Doom Buggy proves to be worth it.

Cheers,
TJ

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