Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Vehicles and items that do not fall into the general M151 categories

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by rickf » April 25th, 2023, 9:04 am

Same with most 151's anymore. Most of the younger generation have neither the tools nor the skills to use them to do a proper restoration. Even some of the so called "pros" (note small letters) do not have the proper skills.
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » April 25th, 2023, 12:41 pm

Well, again, I don't think that makes people with deep pockets any less worthy. Most people don't have the skills, Rick....but they may have the scratch to get it done and in a slightly smaller subset, there is a group who knows when to allow people with the right skills help them make good decisions for the vehicle's restoration (or whatever the goal is).

As for those whose skills and finances are lacking - well, it's a journey, isn't it? Ya gotta start somewhere.

Being able to say - Built. Not Bought about your wheels is certainly going to give you bragging rights but look at Leno. He may not necessarily be right in there with grease up to his elbows every day but, I have no doubt that he's not only a legit gearhead....he's also using his TV skills to share his love of being a gearhead with the rest of us. AND he's smart enough to make it pay....not just for him, either. Look at all the people he employs!

Pretty brilliant if you ask me.

YouTube is also giving people the opportunity to make money at doing whatever it is they're passionate about. Alas, YouTube is making sure those people hitch their proverbial wagon to a system that is demanding of their time and designed, primarily, to make money for YouTube. So, welcome to the Matrix, Coppertop! A lot of the top YouTube participants are getting burned out....Finnegan (Roadkill / Faster With Finnegan) being the latest and he made a wise decision to spend more time with the family. Even Vice Grip Garage seems to have lost much of its down-home flavor to bright lights and shiny paint.

We are all, big fish AND small fish...all at the same time. The immensity of what one is passionate about isn't necessarily the measure of one's passion. A guy with a Honda Minitrail 50 can be just as passionate about his hobby as a guy with a (insert your favorite large FMV here). I am a small fish in the hobby but I am passionate about what I do with FMVs, inasmuch as my many other passions allow. (attention deficit!) There are smaller fish who may look at you or me and they may reckon we're a big fish. But, to receive an appreciative nod from another member of the hobby or even better, some interested passer-by who wants to know more, really is the highest honor you can receive. So, what we do in the hobby really is relative and it hasn't the slightest thing to do with awards.

I have a room in my tiny house called the War Room. The walls are covered (and I mean COVERED) with photos and all sorts of things that are related to wartime history. If I had won a car show award it would be sitting in the closet right now.

Being approachable and knowledgable and sharing the passion is IMHO, what it's all about.

I gotta tell ya, when mother brings her kids up to me and they want to know what my machine is all about and they give me the opportunity to tell them about it (including my passion for the hobby in general) I really feel like I have arrived at the pinnacle of what we do as former military vehicle owners. Best feeling in the world is to be able to spread the joy. But that's me. Others may feel differently about it. I'm pledging that I'm not going to cheapen that by getting sucked into some judging racket like I did last weekend. In my ignorance, I fell for it once. Never again.

But, to end this on a positive note, what the experience DID do for me is sharpen my perspective on all of this stuff. So, I won after all.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » April 25th, 2023, 1:55 pm

With all this discussion, and considering that anyone might be reading through all this, I think this is a good time to do a double-tap on that matter of making a decision to participate, or not participate in a car show...and I want to make sure we are not steering up-and-coming FMV owners away from participating.

Along with all that has been discussed, I would counsel others to get your machine out there and mingle with other people at car shows. Every flavor of gearhead is probably going to be at the smaller car shows. Unfinished, unrestored, and unusual machines are sauce for the goose, as they say. BIG car shows are big productions put on by people who think of themselves as big fish. As has been discussed, they have a financial interest in keeping their show 'just so' so, don't expect red carpet treatment if you arrive in something that doesn't have shiny paint....especially Gama Goats! :lol:

Do take people along with you on your automotive journey.
You just might become the inspiration for others. Remember, how big a fish you are is always relative to how the other guy sees himself or herself. Even if what you have isn't the nicest machine there, that doesn't matter. Most visitors come to the car show because they want to be part of the dream, even if only for a day. They come, they look for inspiration, they imagine themselves doing what you're doing. Heck, some even buy tee shirts so they can go home and continue to dream for a while longer. If you happen to have some lesser quality vehicle, bring it anyway. You will find you're going to be talking to a lot of people who have the same hopes and dreams as you do.

Do NOT be ashamed of what your vehicle ISN'T.
My vehicle is unrestored. I keep it up mechanically because I drive it out on the road with other motorists but, it isn't new or pretty looking. There is enough there that if you step back, the worst bits don't draw the eye. If someone asks me why I don't restore it, I tell them that these vehicles are only original ONCE...and I add my opinion that most restorations are only the restorer's interpretation of what was original. What I don't tell them is, that I like a nicely restored vehicle just as much as the next guy but, since I am a small fish and since I am passionate about a great many things, spending a small mountain of money on one vehicle would mean having to rein myself in on other things that I love. I also don't add that having a beautifully restored vehicle would make me a slave to that vehicle and I have too many FMVs to allow that to happen. As they used to say, The Cobbler's children go barefoot.

Showing your FMV advertises your personal interests and presents opportunities for networking.
Over time, you will be amazed at how many people come forward and either want to provide you with something they think YOU need, or ask if you can provide something THEY need. But, to take advantage of this...ya gotta show up and participate!

Showing your FMV helps you focus on your vehicle.
Spending a day out with your vehicle (and the vehicles of others) has a funny way of helping you figure out what you want to do next with it. At the show, it's all cars, all day long. The daily distractions of home and work aren't there and it becomes easier to figure out what you want to do with your machine, next. What show wouldn't be vastly improved by having more vehicles displayed in various stages of mechanical or physical restoration? How much fun would it be to watch someone perform an unedited Will It Run? effort on something that looks extremely doubtful!

Put your fears about what other people think aside.
Get out there. Be bold. Be involved. Don't worry about what others think. That said, really listen to what others have to say...even if it's negative. Not all advice or opinions are necessarily good but it's what you do with those opinions and advice that makes a difference. You are the Boss of your FMV efforts. If you have a bad experience (as we all do) use it to sharpen your perspectives and use it to refocus your efforts. And don't forget to ask yourself, How am I going to do this better next time...

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » April 27th, 2023, 8:19 pm

Weather has been on again / off again. Today...absolutely beautiful. All the tiny steps of preparation for renewing my tractor's hydraulically assisted steering are mostly behind me and I got straight to the business of building things back up, including the introduction of the Speedi-Sleeve at the point of the hydraulic leak...which is the place where hydraulic fluid was escaping, welling up the steering column, and coming out beneath the steering wheel.

There was one critical step that the last guy failed to take (among many other critical steps) and, sorry fellas, I can't give credit to him for installing a new seal on a badly chewed seal surface. DUH! What concerns me is the fact that, by design, the steering column is meant to rise up or lower as it turns in either direction which means the seal is also going to be moving up and down across the width of that Speedi Sleeve. It's very subtle and amounts to nothing more than 1/8" in total (1/16" in either direction from the neutral position). I took some close measurements and I think I've got the sleeve properly located. If I botched it, I'll only be into the whole thing for another sleeve and the job isn't quite as involved as the original process of R&R-ing EVERYthing. Fingers crossed.

Perhaps the most important part of the whole thing was getting the rust and the crud the metal shavings and metal paste cleaned up and removed. Found the one new thrust bearing I bought to be absolute junk. If the ball bearings are close, but don't actually roll in the groove provided for them, would you use the brand new assembly as a thrust bearing? Of course you wouldn't. I was disappointed, but only something like $20 bucks worth of disappointed.

I ended up being $20 wiser, and while unlucky, it's a small price to pay for enlightenment! Luckily, the junkyard assembly that I had obtained for practice, yielded two good, used thrust bearings so, in they got installed after a close detailing and inspection. The amount of offshore junk being produced is becoming so endemic each of us will have to keep a wary eye open for it. I'm afraid this problem is going to be with us for a long, long time.

Nowadays, you've really got to double-check every single little thing. That's the first lesson for today.

Another lesson coming up. I was unusually tired today. I've been having trouble sleeping lately. So, it was hard to sit down, read the TMs in their tiny little print and draw conclusions and make decisions when what I really needed was a solid nap. Couldn't take the day off. The weather was just too good.

When you're working on something that is not particularly familiar to you (I'm really no hydraulic guru) sometimes it's just best to do your best and when you think you're done, do nothing... other than sit down, have a cup and give things a good thinking over before declaring victory. I took that process one step further and invited Frank the Wizard to come over to be a second set of eyes to look over my work.

I gave him the fundamentals as I understood them and he had a look at the TM. The point was to let him draw his own conclusions without influence from me; all this, so as to ensure his thoughts were his own. He looked it over and he, being a WIzard, but no hydraulic wizard, said he could find nothing wrong with my work. He didn't like the design, though. Neither did I. It was a good design, but not great. Great designs don't lead a machine to eventual self destruction and great designs are obvious to people who are unfamiliar with them.

He was also curious about some evidence of rubbing marks in the glyptal in the lower regions of the steering column but, after discussing them, we concluded they were as a result of the previous guy's terrible workmanship. After that, we did a little Q&A and my explanations about what I DID know, satisfied him.

Sometimes, it's good to have a second set of eyes with a fresh perspective look over your work. That's the second lesson for today.

So, I finished buttoning her up, reattached the hydraulic lines, double checked my torque settings and gave everything a detailed wipe-down which is just another process that makes you take one more close look at the work. Soon, I'll be refilling the system and we'll then see if I actually got things leak-free.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » April 30th, 2023, 11:39 am

Okay, let's switch gears for a moment and get into some weirdness. Some of you love to study photos and draw conclusions so this is chiefly for that bunch. It's something that is being repurposed to become something else. Can you guess what it is? Good luck.

70449008437__4D019830-D064-4FD7-A3D4-93CFF89A7300.jpg

Cheers,
TJ
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by Mark » April 30th, 2023, 2:32 pm

Battery or tool box area?On a m151,A1,A2?
mark


1968 m274A5
1960 m151
1981 m151A2
1964 m416
1971 m416

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » April 30th, 2023, 3:48 pm

Nope, unfortunately, this won't be 151 related.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by rickf » April 30th, 2023, 8:35 pm

It appears to be the right dimensions for an old weight bench and knowing you I would guess an engine or transmission stand.
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » May 1st, 2023, 12:43 am

Close enough. It's exercise equipment, also commonly known as a 'dip station' or a 'power tower'. I brought two of these home from the curb over the course of two weekends, at the time believing that they would yield some useful steel for some project. Apparently, either their owners became sufficiently fit so that they no longer needed them, or they finally came to their senses. Either way, I have two; one is black and one is white. The white one was a little more than an inch wider than the other, hence the need to narrow it.

So, these things sat around and for a while made terrific tables for working and painting odd parts. Tip them over and lay a sheet of junk plywood on them and violà, instant work station! The rest of the time they just stood around, sloughing off cheap foam padding. ANYHOOooo. One day the use for these just suddenly exploded in my head. The project I have been gathering parts for, for YEARS... is a full scale horse-drawn hearse....like the ones outside Disney's Haunted Houses.

So, these two frames, when joined, will become the chassis for the project. Light, in weight, yet strong enough to hold everything together. Joining them required that they have the same width so, hooray!...that has been done and the first actual steps toward building the thing have been accomplished. The concept begins with a strong chassis and the superstructure created from as light a frame as can be made and skinned in materials that are also feathery light. In this case, corrugated plastic. Think - the sort of material a lot of political ad signs are constructed of. I'll also be trying to build in some portability, meaning, in as much as is possible, the thing should be able to be taken apart.

Here are some photos of another large objet d' art I created in 2016. They should give you a sense of how this is going to go. Here is Snoopy, the WWI Flying Ace, executed in the absolute correct dimensions...but in a very large scale. Enjoy.

IMG_0918.jpg
IMG_0928.jpg
IMG_0976.jpg
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » May 4th, 2023, 11:06 am

Had a little luck yesterday. On an outing with the wife (on our 28th anniversary) we decided to pop into one of the area's larger antique malls. Lots of vendors there with most stuff being too high-priced (like, right to the rafters). But in this place, occasionally there is something worthy to be found for a right price...and find it, I did - two gently used Interlog aluminum cased HMMWV composite tail lights with the wiring healthy and still very much intact.... For the low low price of $14.95 each.... and ever so much better than the plastic composite tail light assemblies.

Inside my head I screamed, MINE! I stopped shopping right there and brought them straight up to the checkout counter. The darned things are h-e-a-v-y and there was still some shopping to do. Amy made them, and an as-new Bob Redfern Military Collectors ball cap she found, my anniversary gift.

(after 28 years, she knows me too well)

So, the lights will be tested, given a Level 1 tidy-up and set aside for the next big thing (whatever that is) and I wore my stylish new lid to dinner.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by rickf » May 4th, 2023, 12:29 pm

Thief!!!!!
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » May 4th, 2023, 6:21 pm

When life throws you a bone...

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » May 8th, 2023, 8:50 pm

It works.
It DOESN'T leak.
Tested.
With two witnesses.

So, after my week-long wedding anniversary I finally got back to the tractor and it's hydraulic-assisted steering. The Billmeister wandered over and asked what I was up to and I told him I was about to hook up the very necessary piece of the wiring harness and have a go at it. So, he got a cuppa and a chair and watched me refill the hydraulic pump, hook up the wires and add a bit more gasoline. He jumped in to unseal the air intake which, in its state of disassembly, was pointed skyward and capped off with the discarded cap from a rattle-can and then taped down in order to keep the wrong stuff out while the tractor was laid up.

About that time, Xloflyer, who had been headed home from the post office via Casa de TJ and who had caught us in the driveway doing The Thing with Nickel....well, he decided to stop and see what all the hubbub was about....and he promptly backed over my recyclables can (because, as it turns out, that fancy screen that shows one stuff behind one's truck when one is backing up actually requires that one LOOKS AT IT!) No harm done.

And that's all I will say about that.

ANYhoo, with me up in the driver's seat, on the clutch, with control of the the ignition and BillyBoi on the ether and Xloflyr on the throttle, Nickel fired right up as always and hummed its little tractor tune while I ran the steering hard over, lock-to-lock, TWICE and shut it down. Refilled the reservoir and did it all again. The hydraulic fluid that is in there is still a milkshake and will require draining...

BUT

there were no leaks and the steering was performing flawlessly.

I win.

Again.

Xloflyr set my can back up and headed home and Bill and I headed out to run a few errands and celebrate with an ice cold drink from the local ice cold drink purveyor because it was Hot and Humid, with a capital H....like we wuz working in a Chinese laundry.

When I got back, Sir Billiam hit the road and left me with the next step which was to clean the outside of the fuel tank (the tank that had been put out of use by the other guy). I quickly found the problem. Rust perforation, otherwise known as a ho'. *sigh* The endless litany of problems to be solved shrinks, grows, and shrinks again, ad infinitum. So, I cleaned the outside like a meant it and it looked awesome. I blasted the inside with fresh water from a hose just to see what would come out.

Lots of rust came out. Lots and lots of rust. Rust dust, rust flakes, little pearls of rust....and it looked so pretty on the outside. :roll: So, after draining the water off and letting it sit in the heat for a few hours, I buttoned it up and poured in six gallons of 9% vinegar. I'll let it stew for a while. I'm guessing that leaky bit will open up sometime after I've gone to bed and dribble all over...but it's academic. The rust will soften and tomorrow I will open up the tank at the fuel float and then, between that and the regular filler neck, I'll have at it with the pressure washer after strapping it down.

I feel a tank reseal kit on the horizon, which is fine....but darned expensive. I may not win the battle but I will win the war, one way or another.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » May 11th, 2023, 11:52 pm

Okay. Here's how the tank cleaning efforts went.

As you know, I used 9% vinegar. The bottom of the tank was rusted with a small area of perforation. Above that, the interior of the tank was coated with a dry, chalky, white residue. Consult the internet and you'll get 100 different answers as to what that stuff actually is. So, with the tank a little more than half full, I let the stuff sit for about a day and a half and both of those days were quite warm.

Poured the vinegar out today and I found that it really did a nice job with the chalky stuff. What was left was a nice transformation from rusty bottom to one that was nearly rust-free and all of that without my lifting a finger.

There really is something to be said about chemistry.

Above the fill line, however, the walls of the tank grew darker with some sort of nastiness but whatever it was, wasn't there before which meant it was new and not deeply entrenched. I had picked up an air wand from HF that was meant to siphon up the liquid of my choice and blow it in some sort of stream and, it had a rather nice right angle head to it. I got that chiefly because I thought it might reach some corners of the tank I wouldn't otherwise be able to get to.

It failed miserably....which is to say that it WAS getting to those hard to reach places -but- it wasn't getting the job done to a degree that I felt good about. However, it did provide some proof of concept that pressure washing was going to provide at least some results. Peering into the tank proved that. I also found that getting aerosolized 9% vinegar in one's eye is really very annoying...and that's all I'm going to say about that. :shock:

Now, keep in mind that I often try stuff that (sometimes) doesn't work. Thomas Edison was raised one community over from my home town and he was a fella that did a lot of that sort of thing (trying stuff that sometimes doesn't work) and he was fond of saying that his failures weren't exactly failures but rather, an ever growing list of how NOT to do something. I feel the same way about it and it often steers me in a direction I hadn't yet considered. At some point, the lightbulb comes on and, rarer still, STAYS ON.

Must have been something in the water up there in northern Ohio or it might just be that Ohioans are just a bunch of pig-headed loonies, birthing out successive generations of pig-headed loonies.

I subscribe to the latter theory, by the way.

BUT - lucky you! I share my results for you to consider, good, or bad...so you don't have to do all this work y'self. You're welcome.

So, out came the trusty old power washer, fancy elixirs be damned. Shooting the power washer through the filler neck, the fuel sending unit opening and the pickup tube hole in the tank provided very good access and a thorough blasting made it to about 95% of the interior of the tank. Naturally, the holes aren't big enough to see precisely what one is blasting so most of it was done by a Helen Keller attempt at 'mowing the lawn' which is a sort of back and forth pattern done by feel and then having a bit of a looky-loo and repeating the process. Sounds quite maddening, I know, but it isn't as strenuous as chopping wood or digging ditches so I'm okay with it.

The power washing also brought the tiny rust hole into the form of a larger hole that was no longer rusty, and with good, although somewhat irregular, margins. Lots of good American steel in this tank, so this is one hole that is going to be easy to repair (thank God for small mercies).

However, there was a particular area on the roof of the tank that still had rust nodules (little islands of rust) and it had been above the vinegar and it had probably been above the fuel level for most of this tractor's life. The off-gassing vinegar had done a pretty good job everywhere else but these rust spots were clearly mature rust (rust that is dark brown-to-black and fairly inactive) and fully formed as the result of water condensation in the tank; rust that eventually became tiny little rust stalactites.

So, in response to that, presently the tank is sitting with more 9% vinegar in it and oriented so that the offending area is getting full immersion. With a couple of days of rain coming our way (beginning tomorrow) it will have plenty of time to sit. I'm even toying with the idea of putting a heat lamp underneath it as an experiment, just to try that out to see if it improves matters.

And alas, I do not yet have a tank sealing kit in my hands so, with the matter of flash rust looming, there will be another opportunity for even more action to be taken on this tank. But, the results have been pretty satisfactory and a KBS Coatings kit is on the way.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » May 12th, 2023, 3:44 pm

An interesting day, today. Rather than putting a heat lamp on my fuel tank to energize the 9% vinegar within, I had an apostrophe and decided to use the Oster food warmer that I refused to throw out (the one euthanized by Sir Billiam by taking out his Daniel Boone bolo knife, which is the size of a compact car, cutting open the food warmer's box and straight through its hard-wired power cord). Sometimes I wish Bill would put his own eye out. Might give him pause enough for actual reflection on how he's doing things.

Yes, Bill put the wires back together with wire nuts and Yes, the warmer does work, but despite the repair, it isn't the kind of thing one relies upon in the middle of the annual Christmas soirée. And at that time it was just easier to hustle down to the local grocer who, during the holidays has small mountains of them on pallets for people just like me.

So, I've had this darned thing just laying around and I have been avoiding trashing it because (b) it actually DOES still work (c) the three stainless steel food trays (with lids) are just too handy for stuff (meaning, MY sort of stuff) and (d) I'm an inveterate pack rat. And the problem with being a pack rat is, I too often have 'AH-HAH!' moments that prove being a pack rat DOES pay off.

So, the Oster is plugged in and is very happily making heat and transferring it to the fuel tank and to the vinegar which is puddled within it. When I'm done, I'll throw it away...

or not.

So, with the weather threatening to turn nasty again, I've just been fiddle-farting around picking up the pieces of stuff that has gone undone. "Fiddle-farting" is a term used by my dear old Dad who was always good with a turn of phrase. But, he used the term to describe exactly what I was doing. No plan. Purely reflexive action. So it was -
Go get the laundry out of the dryer where it has been sitting for three days
Discover the dryer doesn't do doodly-squat unless one actually TURNS IT ON.
Transfer the whole stinky mess BACK to the washer to be RE-washed.
Observe the tractor's fuel cap with it's rusty top and degraded gasket.
Decide to get some of the grit out of the smaller regions of the cap with a Dremel because that would actually be measurable progress.
Spend the next 20 minutes sweeping the garage floor and another hour plucking the tiny little wires out of my tee shirt.
Take the cap to the big wire wheel and after removing the rust on top, realize I would be way ahead to simply clean off the whole cap.
Paint the cap with Rust-oleum Paint + Primer, fully realizing that this paint product won't stand up to gasoline.
Decide to source a new cap and determine that no actual OE equivalent replacement of this cap exists.
Search for a new gasket or, gasket material.
Discover that my original Ford gasket is precisely the same as the gas cap gaskets Ford put on Mustangs of similar vintage.
Buy said gasket off of eBay rather than from some Ford Mustang supplier who wants $24 to ship something that fits in an envelope.
Oh, and pound out some more drivel for the 838. What could be more pointless than that?

And so it goes. Heck I might even put my magnetic light kit back together today. Why not?

Cheers,
TJ

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