Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by rickf » May 31st, 2024, 9:10 am

I bought 300 50 cal cans from the estate of a friend of mine, drove to DC to pick them up and at that time the going price was 15.00 a can. Now with all of the extra military training going on people are buying these cans at auction in lots of 1,000 for around 5.00 a can. I don't plan on taking any to the show this year since there is a guy 4 spots down that sells them at half that. I would make a profit at 5.00 a can but for that price I have found I might as well hold onto them and use them at home. They are fantastic for storing ammo in! I wonder if anyone else does that? Almost like they were designed to do that.
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » May 31st, 2024, 9:42 am

My personal Ammo Can WOW moment was an encounter with two pallets of WWII 50 cal ammo cans which had been stored badly. If you can visualize the lids of those cans, their design promotes the collection of water on the lid (with predictable results). So, instead of buying two pallets, I ended up buying about 1/4 of the cans on those two pallets, they being those that survived poorly executed storage.

My second Ammo Can WOW moment came on the heels of negotiating a deal between a metal scrapper and the Nimitz Museum where the museum took several tons of donated 50 cal brass which left the ammo cans that they came in with no job. I showed up to collect the ammo cans I purchased, backed up to the loading dock and discovered a GPW that was about to be scrapped. That went home with me too.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » June 1st, 2024, 1:25 am

Returned to the WC-6 today. Xloflyr informed me he had removed the front bumper (which really needed to be removed a week ago and then made into razor blades). I was curious, because we had been bonking our heads on the darned thing all throughout the glorious Front Axle Experience.

The second thing I observed (after observing the bumper was ACTUALLY removed) was that Xloflyr had a very large bruise on his scalp which kind of looked a bit like all of the land masses on earth, all laid out map-like, and surrounded by an ocean of somewhat thinning hair and human hide. Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Europe, Australia, Africa (again). Almost all were represented, but Antarctica was missing...

probably due to global warming.

The good news was, the frame horns weren't all akimbo as I had expected they might be. One comes to appreciate the small mercies.

So, we turned our attention to completing the removal of the drag link and, happily, the back end wasn't the struggle that the front end had been. We even made a tool out of a 3' section of very hardy strap steel. Xloflyr wanted me to cut off about 3" of it. I pointed out the folly of settling for having a 33" section of strap steel when he could continue to have an intact 3' section so, we used it as-is and it worked very nicely.

Waste not. Want not.

We spent a little time cleaning out the internal threads on the end that had given us so much trouble the day before and wound up being happy with the results after finding that the rear threaded plug would run through the freshly cleaned front threads without too much trouble. That meant only having to buy the kit to renew the drag link, rather than having to buy the whole enchilada and THAT meant spending less money from a budget that had been taking hits from every direction since Day One. The WC-6 has a very sensible design that allows for most things to be renewed as long as some goon with a hammer hasn't done too much damage.

Do the work and save the money for something else.

Satisfied with our results, we switched gears and went after something that had been bugging me ever since the truck went up on the lift. The front end of the front driveshaft (where it coupled to the yoke on the differential) looked a bit 'off' to me. So, we made a close inspection and I discovered that the bearing cup on one end was not seated firmly against the yoke. The bearing cup is a neatly machined arrangement employing a centrally located tooth, or key, on the mating side which is homogenous to the body of the cup. Along with that, the outer edges of the bearing cup are meant to nest into a flange which forms the outer perimeter of the yoke. Thus, each bearing cup becomes firmly fixed in place on every axis...

IF it fits correctly.

Well, it didn't fit correctly. Nope. Some goon had hammered on the yoke for some fool reason and in doing so, had peened the shoulders of one keyway to a degree that not only would it not allow the bearing cup to lay flat against the yoke, it also could not nestle inside the perimeter flange of the yoke. The result of THAT was, the inner edge of the perimeter flange had been nipped on either side of the keyway when the bearing cup body was tightened down on the flange... and then someone drove it like that. So mounted, the bearing cup tried to wrestle its way out of there and couldn't so it just fretted and fumed against the flange the whole time. That damage meant that on one side of the keyway, the damaged metal of the flange intruded into the space meant for the bearing cup and on the other side of the keyway, a thin sliver of metal had been sheered off and was hiding in a glob of grease located where the bearing cup would have been (if it had been installed correctly) and there it remained, trying hard not to be noticed.

Good help is SO hard to find.

So, I got in there and cleaned everything in great detail and with a flat file, carefully brought the keyway back into true. With a 3" cutting wheel I also reshaped the flange of the yoke at that damaged area. All of this reshaping was only to the degree of tolerance that we needed to seat the bearing cups with a soft mallet. Right and tight....

just like we like it.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » June 7th, 2024, 12:14 am

It was quite the day, today....on this 80th anniversary of D Day.

I managed to buy a very rare item, after 12 long years of pleading, prodding, begging, and then simply waiting for a seller to come around to the idea that it was time to hand over ownership of a particularly special item....to me.

What did I buy today? A complete, in the transit case (with all accoutrements), WWII U.S. Army Signal Corps Bell & Howell 'Filmo' Motion Picture Camera, Model PH-430 B. It is used and it was very well taken care of. Surplus tag indicates it was serviceable at the time it was declared surplus in 1956.

Why is such a mundane piece of equipment important, or even desirable? Consider this. Much of what we are able to see of what was taking place in WWII, combat or otherwise, was recorded by equipment such as this but, most of us have never actually seen the naked, unblinking eye that recorded those events and made seeing it possible for us.

Can you imagine landing on a beach on D Day armed with little more than a clockwork film camera?! That endeavor can only be considered as total dedication to a cause.

Can't tell you how pleased I am to finally have it in the collection. Another tiny facet of WWII will be preserved for future generations.

Cheers,
TJ
Last edited by m3a1 on June 7th, 2024, 10:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by rickf » June 7th, 2024, 7:51 am

You need a bigger warehouse! Although I understand the camera. I have quite a few myself. A lot of them I used in my younger years.
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » June 8th, 2024, 10:22 am

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » June 9th, 2024, 5:34 pm

Whew. Is anyone else out there getting baked like I am getting baked?

Yesterday, I began the day with running yet another trailer wheel through the blast cabinet. After this one, the rest should be clear sailing. This particular wheel wasn't the worst of the bunch but the rust was peculiarly hardened and the blaster wasn't really up to the task, probably owing to the high humidity. We have water separators in line but.. I have to choose between blasting early in the day (and standing out in the heat and humidity for a longer period of time) -or- waiting until it's hotter than the hinges of Hell.

And, have mentioned that this is the season where our neighbors in Mexico as conducting the annual slash and burn of their fields? So, air quality in south Texas is not good.

I finally reached a Level 1.0 tidy-up, put everything away, packed up Cooper the Wonder dog, who had found every grass burr in the area (and at present, looked more like a Standard Poodle than a Border Collie because of it) and went back home to brush him out and drop him off.

Next stop, Xlofyr's place, because he had a parts order arrive at his doorstep. Today's mission - to restore the drag link. I rounded up a few thread restoring files because one of the threaded plugs at the end of the drag link had been buggered (not by us) and a rebuild kit didn't include one because they're not considered to be consumable parts. Until a satisfactory replacement could be found, we'll be re-using the old threaded plug after conducting a Level 4.35 tidy-up. The rebuild kit was necessary because not only were there broken springs, there were also parts missing altogether.

So we de-burred and reshaped and trued up the slot in the end of the plug; the slot meant for installing it and setting tension on the flexible connections in the drag link. When we were done, the steering arm was fully restored to serviceability and I realized that my thread files were very much in need of replacement as they had been allowed to bang around inside the previous owner's tool box. So goes another bunch of loot I might have otherwise used for goofing off. I'll have to make it up somewhere else.

Xloflyr's garage/shop is really quite something. It has almost all the basic tools, plenty of space for two guys to work together, a lift, and temporarily, my ancient parts washer (now refitted with a brand new pump) as well as a small break area where guys can sit down comfortably, have a cold snack, and pour over tech manuals. But, there never seem to be enough fans for heat like we are experiencing. I may have to offer up 'El Gigante', my 4' fan. When fans are built with wheels, you know they're big. Until then, we sweat and simply accept that this is price to be paid for getting this truck back on its wheels.

Speaking of wheels, Xloflyr had decided to send his command car's wheels and split rings out to be sand blasted. I can't be jealous because I could do the same but I'm (A) just too cheap to pay someone else to do it, and (3) I am foolish enough to insist upon only perfectly restored wheels that really are nothing more than some very plain-jane agricultural wheels meant for a dingy old hay wagon. Wheels which would really only require a wink and a nudge with a 1" chip brush and a pint of black paint to be made useful again. Once again, I'm making a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

I really need to re-examine my decision-making paradigms.

So, in the spirit of re-examining my decision-making paradigms, today I decided to abandon the wheel for a day of goofing off. So, back to Bussey's Flea Market we went. Hundert Dollah Bill and me. Bill earns the name for having shown up at multiple flea markets with Be-jammin' Franklin in his pocket, KNOWING that flea markets are places that operate on ones, fives, tens, and twenty dollar bills. He doesn't trust himself to show restraint when it comes to buying stuff, I reckon.

I was looking forward to being out of the sun (which we were, but only occasionally) and out of the heat (which we weren't...at all). So, I wasn't getting much rest. What I DID get was a very lovely, turn of the century, Bemis & Call 14" Model 48 S-wrench, which is suitable for tightening your nuts. Everybody needs their nuts tightened from time to time. I paid a low-low price for it because the fellow who was selling it was primarily selling far more modern tools and he had apparently promised himself that he'd unload the ancient thing on the first sucker who showed any interest in it whatsoever. (...and that would be me)

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The trip home was where the action really happened. This is the time of the month all the lunatics trot their cast-off stuff out to the curb for Large Trash Pickup Day. Personally, I am loath to have junk piled up out by the curb in front of my house. This is South Texas....not West Virginia. So, MY junk stays in the yard...

where I can keep an eye on it.

So, there we were, cruising down Rosewood Avenue, eyeballing the junk piles as we see them and there it was. NO! Can't be! Yes! YES it IS! There sat a modest Skilsaw table saw, with legs, on a platform with wheels, and with nearly everything it came with new (except for the guard) and not a mark on it. Vert der Furk? We hopped out and like grave robbers, we threw it and several other goodies in the truck. Three blocks later, I was unloading the table saw and the other booty. We plugged it in and fired it up.

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Yeah. it worked. Of course it worked! In fact, it worked just fine. Everything that supposed to go around and around went around and around. Everything that was supposed to adjust, adjusted. Everything that was supposed to make angles, made angles.

Something is wrong with people nowadays....and I love em for it. Came away with some mexican blankets of exactly the type I use to cover the back seat of Longfellow in order to haul Cooper (and his collection of grass burrs) around. Opened up what I thought was going to be a pop-up chair...which turned out to be a pop-up hunting blind, along with two deerskin rugs...

so, I reckon the hunting blind must actually work.

Anyhoo, it has been a longish day...a hot day...and a darned good day.

Cheers,
TJ
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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by rickf » June 9th, 2024, 8:53 pm

Has Amazon closed any of their fulfillment centers around you? I know a guy who might be interested in a half million square feet of space. :twisted: :twisted: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » June 10th, 2024, 10:22 am

Well, I freely admit, I don't have am intermodal container in my yard.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by rickf » June 10th, 2024, 9:04 pm

I would if the damn township would allow it. A 40 footer at that.
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » June 10th, 2024, 11:59 pm

Another solar flare?! Great. I may have to whomp up some jerky beef, what with Ol' Sol working overtime.

We had a tremendous rain early this morning, for which we are all very grateful. Cooper the Wonder Dog cowered on my bed and made a small nuisance of himself until I fell back to sleep. Our community's little river has a reasonable amount of water in it now...at least for the moment.

Today, I did MORE acid washes on this stupid trailer wheel. There is a small island of rust that just won't give up, right in the elbow of the flange of the wheel. So, I applied the acid, neutralized it, dried it, hammered the rust to bits with the needle scaler...twice...and sweated buckets while doing it. Finally got down to it and tomorrow, will go back to the blast cabinet for the final clean up which will be pleasantly short and sweet and then it'll go straight into primer which I will allow to bake in the heat for a day, then paint....and bake some more. Patience and a lot of heat makes the paint rock hard.

While out there, I grabbed another wheel and just decided to paint it with whatever amount of acid I had left over. Never pour tainted acid back into the original container as it will just sully your virgin acid. Thus, I begin wheel number 3 with acid instead of mechanical means of rust removal. I just doped it up and let it bake in the sun. The teeny tiny rust blooms that were poking through the paint disappeared, leaving bright yellow paint in it's wake. It all has to come off, of course, but it's an indicator that something is happening, whereas the larger rust spots just sit and glare at me. This application is not a miracle cure for rust at this early stage but it is certainly a step in the right direction and makes the best use of my resources.

Onward. Ever onward.

Cheers,
TJ

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by rickf » June 11th, 2024, 8:59 am

I wish I had this guys money and resources!!! A pool filled with evaporust to dunk a complete car frame in!!!!

A gallon of Evaporust is 30.00!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwxwABnAsRU
1964 M151A1
1984 M1008
1967 M416
04/1952 M100
12/1952 M100- Departed
AN/TSQ-114A Trailblazer- Gone

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by raymond » June 11th, 2024, 9:59 am

Used to be places in St. Louis that would acid dip an entire car frame/body to remove rust and old paint.
Due to environmental concerns/waste disposal, I doubt anyone is doing that anymore.
Raymond


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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » June 11th, 2024, 5:53 pm

St. Louis is still doin' it. Just had a high school chum dip the Chrysler 300F he got from me back in the late 70s. And by just, I mean, last month. He lives in the greater St. Louis area.

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Re: Beverly Hillbillies, Part Deux

Unread post by m3a1 » June 11th, 2024, 7:58 pm

So, I walked away from the next wheel on the to-do list after having doped it up with the leftover muriatic acid. It wasn't a big deal doing it. I just used the 1" chip brush and painted the remaining acid on until what I had left from the other wheel was gone. I went out this morning and checked on it. In places where the yellow paint was thin, it had pretty much gone back to a liquid and sloughed downward until it dried. Happily, that process broke the bond between paint and steel and I was left with some pretty clean metal and paint that was surprisingly anxious to depart. In places where there had been rust, it just turned black and kind of scrunched upward into a scab....annnd the acid was dry.

I took the wheel that was now nearly finalized back to the sand blaster for one last go this morning. No more islands of rust. Just metal that was back to the grey....and then straight to Rustoleum's Rusty Metal Primer because it's just good business.

Bear in mind, all of this effort does not make pitting (pitting, as a result of rust) disappear. Pitting does not concern me because these wheels/tires will have tubes and flaps and as you might have imagined, by this time, I had a pure, virgin metal surface and one that was even better than that frame the guy did with evaporust. (Great video by the way, thanks for sharing.)

Speaking very frankly, achieving that level of goodness is not magic. It simply means not settling for anything less than perfect and perfect is achieved by willing yourself to go after each little bit that you find along the way until you've reached your personal level of acceptability.

Later, I went after the dried-acid-sloughing-paint-rust-scab wheel with the right angle grinder and the knotted wire cup wheel thingy (which is becoming greatly diminished by constant and repeated use. Most of the objectionable stuff flew right off the wheel (I had a large fan blowing the bits away from me) and what cannot be reached by the knotted wire cup will soon be knocked off by the media blaster. What it know now is - BEGIN WITH THE ACID and save yourself a lot of work. It really was a great leap forward. All of this is a process based solely upon what work I had in front of me and what I felt was best, given the particular circumstance. One shouldn't be afraid to try things in a slightly different order, eh?

Cheers,
TJ

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